Fulfilling More Than One Requirement with a Single Activity

Leaders often ask, “Can one activity count for multiple requirements?” Topic 4.2.3.6 of the Guide to Advancement explains it can, as long as these three conditions are met:

  • The two requirements match up exactly.
  • The two requirements have the same intent.
  • The requirements do not state otherwise.

In some cases, the underlying activity may be the same, but different actions are necessary to fulfill the requirements as written. For example, camping in a tent on a troop outing counts towards the Second Class or First Class camping nights requirement and satisfies certain requirements for the Camping merit badge. Here, the requirements and intent are the same. Thus, the requirements do not forbid the multiple use of the activity for the requirements.

For the Scout working on Communication and Citizenship in the Community merit badges, additional work is required.

The Communication merit badge requires the Scout to attend a public meeting where several points of view are given on a single issue, carefully taking notes of each view, and then presenting a report to his counselor that includes all points of view.

Citizenship in the Community, however, requires the Scout to attend a public meeting and report back to his counselor on what he heard and which side he agreed with.

Thus, if the Scout plans ahead to ensure the meeting program includes a discussion of issues, then both requirements could be met as written. He should report on all sides of the discussion for Communication and take a position on which side he favored for Citizenship in the Community.

The Hiking merit badge, on the other hand, states in the notes at the bottom of requirement 4, “The required hikes for this badge may be used in fulfilling hiking requirements for rank advancement. However, these hikes cannot be used to fulfill requirements of other merit badges.” This is a good example of where the requirement states otherwise. Counselors will encounter these types of situations. Under-standing the aim of requirements is important.

(Reprinted from January-February 2018 Advancement News)